Posted tagged ‘domain education’

Education domain names are a tough sale

September 22, 2011

Do you own education domain names? Have you been able to sell your education domains? Most education websites never reply back. It doesn’t matter how great your education domain name is; education companies either overlook e-mails or disregard them altogether.

You’re wasting your time buying and selling education domain names. The only value an education domain name holds is ad revenue. Unless you own OnlineDegree.com, OnlineDegrees.com, DegreePrograms.com, CollegeDegrees.com, CollegeDegree.com, Degree.com, Degrees.com, OnlineCollegeDegrees.com and other top education domain names, then you are out of luck.

I assure you that good education domain names are a tough sale. If you don’t believe me, attempt to sell your top dot com and dot org education domains. I let many education domains drop, even several worth in the 4 figure range. I don’t care about worth and value. WhyPark revenue is dead. It doesn’t make sense to develop education sites when you lack any interest to contribute content.

After attending college since the mid 90’s and recently earning a graduate degree this past March, I have no interest to build education domains. I possess a great deal of knowledge about degree programs and academic content. For the most part, education domains never produced a quality lead. Who’s going to buy your education domains? The top education domains already own and operate the best domains. Nevertheless, it doesn’t take a great education domain to generate revenue. Some of the worst education domain names are making a fortune.

Beware of education domain names.  If you are confident in your domain sales and parking approach, then go right ahead with securing education domain names. I personally think education domains are a waste of time. Tasl.com owns the top education domains. However, their 300 education domains are poorly implemented. The generic education domain names are unable to deliver traffic to the main education website.

The domain industry as a whole is strange. End-users purchase the strangest domain names for extremely high amounts. For some odd reason, many of these overpriced sites are never developed. A top domain name such as ResumeServices.com was never developed, parked, or even pointed to another website. Resume.com and Resumes.com only generate a combined 47,000 unique visits per month.

On the opposing side, BestSampleResume.com is scoring 604,000 unique per month. Two top generic domains that collectively cost between $700,000-$800,000 are essentially under performing. A mediocre resume domain such as BestSampleResume.com is killing their competition in the resume industry.

I suppose end-users lack an innovative plan to maximize their generic domain names. It’s sickening to see overpriced domains show up on the DNJournal.com domain sales report. Many end-users wait too long to acquire a domain name they need. They end up bidding high to secure a domain name, thus, making elite domainers more rich and arrogant.

Reading an elite domain investor’s article is irritating. I have no clue why a domain noob wastes their time on these domain blogs. The elite domainer is unclear with their domain tips. They string domain noobs along to generate consistent traffic and revenue. If elite domainers were actually providing a service, then newbies would learn much faster than wasting thousands of dollars buying the wrong domains.

Domain newbies hang out on domain blogs and domain forums. They ask the same domain questions over and over again. Domain blog owners eventually insult these domainers once they realize there is no revenue potential. Domain newbies hold value when they use the products and services featured on the domain blog. Moreover, the domain newbie has value when they own top generic domain names registered pre-2004.

Some domain owners purchased quality domain names early on. They planned to implement these domains into their business plan. Then, there are domain owners who purchased domains for investment purposes. These two domainer categories are considered newbies or noobs since these individuals are trying learn the foundation of the domain industry.

As a domain noob, don’t overspend on education domains. You must evaluate an education domain to determine whether there is revenue potential. Education domains are worth money for their keyword value such as average keyword results, exact searches per month, CPC, and type-in value. There are good education domains that are a tough sale. No education company has ever made any contact to inquire about an education domain. Education websites ignore e-mails and phone calls.

You are wasting your time and money acquiring education domains. However, excellent web developers will score good revenue with education domains. Domain parking revenue is no longer a good revenue strategy. Google hit WhyPark sites hard. Sedo pays out pennies on education ad clicks. GoDaddy cash parking penalizes inorganic traffic. Therefore, many domain parking companies keep the lion’s share of their revenue earnings. You need to own thousands of good domains to be considered for InternetTraffic.com’s parking program.

In essence, education domain names are a tough sale. They have the potential to earn good ad revenue. You can contribute quality content to build good leads. However selling education domain names is not lucrative enough to build and or to expand an education portfolio. If you know another domainer or company that operates in the online education space, you may want to consider investing in education domains. Domain newbies should focus more on acquiring good dot com and dot org education domain names, preferably dot com.