Recent Fusible Article on World Wide Media’s rejected offers

The following list reveals offers that were rejected by Word Wide Media. Fusible reported on the rejected offers to demonstrate the growth of the domain industry. I find a few of the domains overpriced, questioning who is making such offers to acquire them.

The domain industry is confusing when end-users are making huge offers for such domains, and then they reject offers on major service domains that are relevant to their business plan. I called an end-user several times, and she always made excuses regarding specific domains that would send business her way. I only asked $200 per domain, knowing that one domain in the package could easily fetch $1,000 in the next 6 months.

As domainers, should we remove Sedo’s fixed price option? Why set a price when you may receive a high offer for an overvalued domain? I know I own some good domains because I’m in the midst of a negotiation that has lasted close to 2 weeks now. The negotiation is not up to my expectations, so I plan to reduce the amount only another $100. I will stick to that amount until the buyer refuses to pay the amount, or when I decide to end the negotiation process.

This is one of those rare instances where I need the money, refusing to accept an counter offer that is only 15% of what I want for the domain. I don’t think I’m asking too much for the domain, especially when the buyer has the ability to make back the purchase price within a year. I have no idea who is trying to acquire the domain. There has to be a reason they want the domain, but I know enough about the industry to retain the domain until I receive the right offer.

There are many times I have to make sales to survive. This is one time where I will wait to earn the amount I think I deserve. I will hold back the criticism on the following domains. I’ll let you all be the judge on assessing the rejected offers.

Fusible claimed that D.tv was registered this past year. How is that possible when many domain registrars don’t offer buyers the option to register domain that are less than 3 characters? In my opinion, the most valuable domain listed below is Stuff.com. The domain is easily valued at 5 times more than the offer made.

Many posters have challenged me on what determines a domain’s value. Their argument is usually narrow, and unsupported. The rejected offers came from the Fusible blog. I don’t think I’m asking too much for my domains.

I agree that the domains in the rejected offers list are valuable names, but there are a few that puzzle me. I’ll never understand why I’ll get rejected trying to sell domains that are just as valuable as the ones listed below, but then the DN Journal will report on high priced sales that are not worthy.

Many major companies bid on keywords in their niche, but they refuse to pay 10% of the value for a generic service domain, or 50% of the amount for a generic 4 character domain with huge potential. In my opinion, many online companies are stuck in traditional advertising. They refuse to entertain the possibility that paying $15,000 for a domain will save them $100,000 in the next 5 years on advertising costs. Most importantly, they will own the domain for as long as they keep up with the registration fees.

I will never understand over priced offers, and under priced offers. How do these companies determine what to offer for a domain? World Wide Media reject offers because they can. They have millions in capital, as well as thousands of domains to function in the domain industry. DN Journal reports on ShopKids.org, a domain that was recently offered for sale at $750 with no buyers. Then, the domain scores a $5,100 sale. Why?

I advise you all to ask more for your domains. It seems that companies will reject domains that are under priced because they assume such domains have little commercial value, and are not worth developing. The buyer may potentially respond with a lesser offer, so don’t sell yourself short. If these domain companies and private parties can fetch huge amounts for their domains, you can also do the same. Good luck!

D.tv $125,000
iBill.com $100,000
VisitBerlin.com $100,000
345.com $75,000
Stuff.com $75,000
MotocycleHelmets.com $60,000
RestaurantSupply.com $50,000
Aili.com $40,000
TheTour.com $30,000
Kevin.me $10,000
Ayanna.com $10,000
FreshPrints.com $10,000
BettertoKnow.com $10,000

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