Bad deal for overpriced Domains

I find it hard to believe that Afternic scored top sales for domains that didn’t belong on the top of the list. In my opinion, MAAC.com and MLKonline.com are way overpriced.

MLKOnline.com is a non-profit website dedicated to Martin Luther King Jr. Did the owner have to pay $42,500 to show his respect for the late MLK? How is Afternic able to pull off such big sales? I’m puzzled by the prices paid for random domains. Of course, the domain is nearly 10 years old, but many argue that age has little to do with a domain’s value. However, I disagree with that notion.

I support a small percentage of the sales on the current domain sales list. I don’t understand how the former owner of MLKOnline.com thought the domain was worthy of a $60k+ price tag. The domain eventually sold for much less than the original price. When you visit the page, all there is a few links, as well as a famous MLK speech from 1957.

I would have assumed there would be a nice photo tribute and a few videos other than just having the links reroute to You Tube and to the .net version of the same very site. I’m amazed that a simple page cost the new owner a whopping $42,500. I’m thinking the .net probably scored a lot of traffic, so the .com was then priced to mirror the traffic results. MLKOnline.net unique traffic peaked at 150K unique visitors last year.

The most unique visitors MLKOnline.com produced in the last year was 596 in January 2010. In my opinion, the domain was way overpriced due to the .net being developed in much more successful website. I believe the purchase is more sentimental than for investment purposes.

MLK will always be remembered for his contribution to humanity. He is the essence of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Housing Act of 1968. MLK’s courage is unsurpassed. In my opinion, paying $42,500 to put up a simple page with links directing people to another page is mind boggling.

MAAC.com is another head scratcher at $63,000. I realize an apartment company wanted to secure a new home for their initials. But to pay a $63,000 price tag is far too steep. I offer my apologies to Mike at The Domains for even challenging his rejected offers. His domains are super gems compared to the current DN Journal sales list, which is horrific.

It makes me feel that I gave a company the best deal on a particular domain. I know that I own domains that can easily outperform what I see showing up on the lower categories of the DN Journal sales list. I know how people get more for their domains; they ask for a higher price.

I would maybe agree with the MAAC.com purchase, considering there is no possible way they could acquire MAC.com. In any case, asking more for your domains will score you exposure and confidence. Don’t let all these sellers enjoy high sales while you sit back waiting to find a buyer. Good luck on making big sales.

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2 Comments on “Bad deal for overpriced Domains”

  1. nic tanney Says:

    You mention older registered domains have a bit more value, I tend to believe that also. Anyway back in “98” i received an offer on one of my domains, keep in mind I never placed a domain on the market, anyway I received an email offering me $150,000 dollars, thinking it was a bogus offer I shot an email back and told them the price was $200,000. A few more emails back and forth and we agreed on $187,500. Guess what? They paid. Anyway now that I am at the sunset I figured I would sell my other domains, blow the money in Vegas or just have a great time.

    Nic

    • Jason Says:

      Hi Nic,
      The domains you listed are quality sites. Their 1999 domain age adds more value to them. End-users will make large offers on domains they feel will market their products and or services. Congratulations on the $200K sale back in the 90s. That’s a great accomplishment. Older domains tend to hold value when they are good marketable niches. Thanks for sharing your domain story.


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