How to become a good domain seller

The most common questions that are asked on domain blogs and forums are how to sell a domain and is my domain any good. What does it take to become a good domain seller? From my experience, you have to learn from your experiences. I made selling mistakes that eventually ruined several sales. Surely enough, I wasn’t happy about giving out too much information, or asking too much money for a domain. How does one become a good domain seller?

Most end-users don’t know a domain investor is selling a domain name. They may develop a business plan, which calls for the marketing team to secure a domain name. Essentially, good companies know the value of a domain name. If the company is unable to secure the generic name, they will make it a point to go after a subdomain of the generic name. What many are not fully aware of is that these subdomains of the generic name can become high performers. CareerBuilder.com is a powerful job site that generates nearly 12 million unique visitors per month, and nearly double that amount in total page views. Selling high traffic sites is another ball game.

The first step to becoming a good domain seller is to learn about domain tools. Many blog posters are going to sway you away from domain tools, which will lengthen your learning curve. Domain websites such as Compete.com (evaluates unique traffic, page views, and keywords), Sewatch.net (website keywords, GPR, and site tags), Alexa.com (Alexa Traffic Rank, popular keyword searches, and sites that link in), Valuate.com and Estibot.com (Domain valuation platforms), DomainTools.com (Whois lookup, domains for sale, and domain creation date and expiration), WebsiteOutlook.com and 7zoom.com (overall domain appraisals based on Alexa, GPR, backlinks, and domain age).

In essence, the more you learn about domain tools, the more seasoned you will be to cook a sale. Think of vehicle sales associates that use vehicle features as a hook to reel in the customer. Every time a customer asks about the price, the sales associate will change the subject because they know they can easily lose a customer with revealing the price too early. Domains operate on the same platform. As a domain seller, learn everything there’s to know about the domain’s niche, the buyer’s website or business (target audience, site traffic, CPC bidding, and etc.), and the price you want for the domain. You will usually know how to set the price. It really depends on the domain name, the market, the buyer’s traffic, and the value of the product and or service.

Websites that produce 100,000+ unique visitors per month will have a great deal of capital to invest. Even domain blog owners that generate 5-80K unique visitors per month have deep pockets because they also run companies. You’re not going to ask $10,000 on a domain for a website that only has 400 unique visitors per month. Know your market. What role does the buyer play in the niche? Are they a top performer? Or are they looking to move up the ranks? High traffic websites most likely have the money to spend. Your goal is to build interest in the domain.

Use Google to search the domain’s keywords. Determine which advertisers are bidding on the keywords. Make a list of those websites. Also, look at what sites are positioned on the first two pages. Add them to the list, but separate the advertisers from the websites. Label them to identify the difference. Visit the website. Click on the ‘contact us’ link on the homepage page. Usually, you will find the link on the bottom of the site, or at the top of the page. Present the domain to the end-user, telling them that you own the domain name, and you want to sell it to them.

You can tell them a specific price, but if the price is too high you may never receive a reply. Give them the bait so they’ll come to you. They will know from the moment they see the domain name whether it will compliment their business plan. If you present a domain name that the company uses, mention to them that acquiring such a domain will reduce their advertising cost because they will now own the category. However, they may bid on other keywords, so it is best to only mention your domain’s keywords.

When contacting more established websites, keep your sales pitch to a minimum. More than likely they already know the value of advertising, and what a domain name can do for them. If they ask you questions, you can give them some information. Domain tools will help you to educate a less established buyer, and or low traffic website to find value in a domain. The more information you share, the greater chance you have to make a mistake. If an end-user expresses interest, tell them the price of the domain. Don’t try to tell them what they can do with the domain, or mention any branding options. Thank them for replying back, and then provide them the price.

How do you price a domain? You can use Valuate and Estibot, though they may provide high or low appraisals to complicate the sale. You have to know how important the keywords are to an end-user. Most of the time, the generic name may be more than they want to spend. but then there are some end-users that already know the value of a domain. If a domain name is very unique and is specific to the company, don’t be afraid to ask more for the domain. After you make the sale, there is a strong chance the domain will increase in value. The more work a company puts into branding the domain, or even advertising the domain to build traffic in that particular area, the likelihood the domain will soar in value. Selling quality domain names is a challenge due to future value. I’ve seen a 3 character .com sell at $38k, only to be resold a few months later for 13 times more than the previous sale. That’s a tough sale to watch.

I would recommend using Sedo to complete sales. You can provide the buyer with the information to find the domain sales page. Sedo is quick with communicating to the seller to push the domain to them. They take payments, as well as make payments without delaying the process. I never experienced any problems with Sedo’s transfer team. From my standpoint, I realize the reason Sedo is the number #1 domain aftermarket sales leader.

There are times when a deal will not be instant. You may have to wait longer than expected to make a sale. Never lose your patience. Keep being persistent to ensure the buyer knows that you’re there to help. Don’t be too pushy. Always remain professional, showing respect from the beginning to the end. Advanced domain investors can complete deals directly with the buyer.

However, new domainers should use a domain sales platform to complete their first sale. It is best to become familiar with the sales process. You can learn to push domains to another registrar, as well as to another domain company. Selling a domain from within a registrar is effortless. Though, not the same can be said about pushing a domain outside of a registrar. I will write a future post on domain pushing. You can also visit DomainNamePush.com to watch videos and view the steps on the homepage.

Thank the buyer for purchasing your domain. Keep in contact with the buyer. Pricing a domain is important. If you price the domain too high, you will lose a sale. Pricing the domain too low will cost you a significant amount. Always communicate your intentions. If you don’t hear from the buyer, send them a e-mail. Of course, this article is more for those that need help making a sale. Experienced sellers usually have their personal sales technique set in place.

Advertise your domains for free on Craig’s List, Sales Spider, and other free advertising platforms. Send the potential lead to your domain sales page. Unless you know the buyer, or they’re a popular Internet brand, be careful with who you deal with in the sales process. Don’t give out too much information. Avoid taking checks or money orders as a form of payment. Only use PayPal to accept payments. In order to avoid conflict, have another domain company facilitate the deal. It is acceptable to work directly with popular websites, but dealing with strangers you don’t have a business relationship with can spell trouble. Trust is a major issue. Know your buyer.

Contact as many end-users as you can. You can tweak the content a little to personalize the sales pitch with addressing the e-mail to the end-user. Target advertising costs; challenge whether they’re receiving the results they want. If you find a potential lead that is serous, then you can invest time into completing the deal. Selling is a challenging process. When you get used to communicating with end-users, you will become more comfortable. Develop a sales strategy that works best for you. Be confident that you own the best domains. Never mention you own less appealing, or mediocre domains. You need to set the tone right away. Convey to the end-user what you want. Good luck on making a sale.

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18 Comments on “How to become a good domain seller”

  1. RK Says:

    Very nice post,thanks.When you list the domain names on Craigslist, which categories do you normally pick?

    • Suisun Blog Says:

      @RK,

      Thanks for the comment. When I list on Craig’s List, I usually place the domain in the ‘General Sale’ category or the ‘Business” category. It depends on the domain name. You can also list a domain in the computer category. My two sales were due to listing in the general sales category.

      Any domain name you think can function as an online business can be listed in the business category. Use the general sales category for specific GEO domain names such as a tourist destination in San Francisco. i.e. Service-related domains.

      Use the listing as a way to send a buyer to another platform. I receive a lot of spam, but I can determine the real buyers from the spam. If you’re familiar with Craig’s List, place domains in areas where they will attract attention. A sports domain may be popular in New York City, whereas a retirement domain may do well in Florida.

      I find that setting reasonable prices is most important. I can check my Sedo account to determine whether the ads are generating attention. If you use a fixed price, it may be too high for them to buy the domain. However, don’t sell yourself short with asking too little. You can complete private deals, but you have to develop a strategy to avoid any scams.

      For the most part, you will probably be dealing with people that know less than most domain investors. Some companies may look on Craig’s List to find a bargain for SEM purposes. Selling on Craig’s List only worked twice. I made two sales at the end of February. Toward the end of the year, you will not receive as many inquiries. At this moment in time, it is a good opportunity to test Craig’s List. If you list in the business section, mention that the domain can operate as a business.

      If you have any questions, let me know. Good luck. Thanks.

  2. RK Says:

    Thanks a lot.I think that your blog is the only one out there that gives the actual info on domain selling, the other ones just pouring water.Will keep on reading: definitely worth it!

    • Suisun Blog Says:

      @RK,

      Thanks for your feedback. I think it’s better to share personal experiences. Many domain blogs mention what others sell, domain news, or what elite domain investors are doing. They will rarely tell you what domain name is good. Most of the time they will refer a domainer to another domain blog or forum to find information. It’s good to ask questions. You will find a few that will take the time to help you.

      Other domain posters try to discredit my information because they know I have experience. Practical experience is the best. I will definitely write more articles on selling. In my opinion, I think every domain investor wants to make a sale. How to sell domains or how much a domain is worth are the main topics on every blog. I find that blog owners are so busy with their business, there is not enough time for them to share detailed facts. Thank you reading. I value your feedback.

      • RK Says:

        “I find that blog owners are so busy with their business, there is not enough time for them to share detailed facts.” I totally agree with you on that one! Thanks for writing.I just started to read your blog yesterday, so didn’t come across any posts related to hyphenated names. I see that you have at least 1.Are you a fan of those, or do you think that they are not worth registering?Thanks

      • Suisun Blog Says:

        I think hyphenated names are valuable when they have traffic, or when they separate keywords that are marketable. For example, Resume-Writing.com, Resume-Service.com, Resume-Services.com, Nursing-Jobs.com, service domains, job domains, exact generic products, and those that have many backlinks and unique traffic.

        I purchased many NYC hyphenated names, but never sold any. I made up for it with selling a few NYC names such as a cake domain and a dozen taxi domains. Since I like New York City, I purchased many hyphenated names. I depended on the appraisal platforms to determine their value. They corrected their appraisals, which many are not even worth more than $50.

        I think any name can be monetized to make money. Hyphenated names are good to separate keywords. I see them sell on Go Daddy’s auction. They usually have unique traffic, Google Page rank, backlinks, and sites that link in. I’m not a fan of new hyphenated names, because they are harder to sell. I know of a few investors that register hyphenated .co and .com in cleaning, home services, jobs, and hotels.

        The only hyphenated domain I purchased since winning one in an auction last Jan and the NYC domains was Resu-mes.com. If you’re hyphenated domain appraises above $200, you can submit it at Bargain Domains. I heard that any 3D related names that make sense are getting buy-it-now offers. The system will usually inform you of the domain value. You can either sign up at Estibot or use Valuate to appraise the domains. If you know the niche is popular, you can ask way more than the appraisal. Appraisals are only tools. You can determine the price without reason, or if the domain is a popular niche, then set it high.

        I have a domaining resources section on the top right side of the blog. Why Park is a good place to develop hyphenated names. Businesses buy those names when they have good traffic. Check out the auction to see which hyphenated names are getting bids. Sedo has a lont of foreign buyers. They like hyphenated domains. It really depends on how many hyphens there are.

        For flipping purposes, I would probably experience many challenges trying to sell multi-hyphenated names. I prefer specific .com, .us, .info, .org, and .net in the order. People want the .com, .org and .us job domains. They can easily monetize them to make money. Most of my sales are .com and .us domains. Hyphens work for GEO-niche.com. NewYorkCity-Apartments.com, or NYC-Hotels.com, Chicago-Attorneys.com, and other popular niches. If you plan to develop them, you can use a many hyphens. The more hyphens, the less appraisal value. However, hyphen names that have traffic don’t rely on appraisal value because unique traffic is the key value. Thanks.

  3. RK Says:

    Actually just thought about another question: do you sell only your own names, or do it for others also? If you’re not doing it now are you planning to in the future? Thanks again for the valuable info.

    • Suisun Blog Says:

      @RK,

      I sell my own domain names. I’m trying to sell for another, but I was dealing with too cheap companies that were too frugal to spend a dollar. I was presenting valuable domains that are in the 90’s. It’s important to find companies with money to spend. You can do that with analyzing their traffic. A website that generates at least 100K+ unique per month are not going to question and 4 figure offer. Whereas, a site with 2-3K unique may try to get a bargain, which complicates a deal.

      Resume, education and job domains are the best niche to invest into right now. They’re easy to sell. Always keep your Whois up-to-date because you never know when you’ll receive an offer. I received an offer this morning for a .us job domain. It’s rare I receive a random offer. The e-mail is credible because the person was trying to register the domain, but I already owned it. If you use Go Daddy, take advantage of the premium domain listing for 30% commission. You can always adjust the price higher to offset the fees.

      Any person trying to register a specific name may find the name, and buy it right on the spot. You will receive payments either by check or through another payment option. I didn’t list this particular job in the premium domain due to wanting to keep it. The offer was good, and the buyer wanted the domain. This is a rare offer. I usually have to put in work to make a sale. I just sold a .com, which took a week to close. I was persistent and patient throughout the process. I contacted the company directly, knowing they use a specific service. It’s good to use domain tools. They help you to close sales.

      I would list your domains on several domain sites such as Sedo, Go Daddy, BuyDomains.com, on Craig’s List, SalesSpider.com, the Yahoo sales app, Ebay, and other places. Always stay firm on the price you want. Don’t take chances on a low reserve, especially if there is a chance the buyer will pay less. Use the CL and SS as marketing tools to push a buyer to your sales page. You can also use Why Park to list a domain for sale. If you have a high traffic website, list your domains up for sale. Sell a domain as if you’re trying to sell a home or a car. Build value into the domain. Don’t share too much information unless they ask. Many times sharing less is better.

      Be direct, persistent, professional, and genuine. Many companies know there are scam artists out there. They have to be sure you’re the real deal, so building a business relationship will open doors to future sales. The most important aspect of selling is trust. When you can find people that you will trust you, there is no limit to selling. Ask more for quality domains. Don’t depend on appraisal systems. They serve as tools to help me. A $1600 domain that is 14 years old may actually score a 6 figure deal. Contemplate what you want before you send a request.

      Another strategy is to email an end-user that you own a specific domain, and you are selling it. Provide them with a link to Sedo, or any other sales platform of you choose. Mention to them that they can save on advertising costs, have a nice domain to help brand their site, and that it will be a good marketing tool to compete against their competitors. Tell them you’re offering the domain to several other companies. The link will serve as an indicator to determining the interest at a set price. You will receive responses. Selling in the Winter is hard, but it can be done. January-March 1st are good months to sell. In April-June, there is a decline in responses. As long as you’re active, and are confident about your domains, you will make consistent sales.

      Some people ask me to evaluate their domains. The first thing they say is their domains are not good, or they’re not appealing. Showing confidence in your domains will show results. You can own a $100K domain, but will struggle to sell it at $10K. However, presenting the domain to the right person will net you $50K. That’s the reason domain companies are successful. They know where to find the right buyers. I’m using the Thomas Edison light bulb approach. I never look at failing as a mistake. You can better improve the next time around. Always buy domains that you know you find a buyer.

      Jobs, resumes, education, GEO hotels, rentals, 4 character .com, and etc… If you haven’t already, check out the DN Journal’s weekly domain sales report (Wednesday). You’ll be amazed at the prices many domains sell at. Ask plenty of sales questions. I posted ads at a college campus, at stores, and in cafes. I never produced a sale that way, but I experimented with the technique. It never hurts to pay $20 to promote a domain at Sedo. There are millions of domains that are up for sale. Many people don’t have the time to find what they need. Auctions are popular for that reason alone. However, the domain companies have strict criteria set into place to which domains they will accept. People will complain, but these companies must use the domains to promote their premium auctions.

      Buy good .com names. You won’t find too much resistance to sell these names. .com and .org job domains are good. The same goes for .com and .org education names. If you plan to develop the site, the CPC is important. Education domains with ‘online’ in them or specific names generate good ad clicks.

      To answer your question, I may consider looking into selling for others. It really depends on the niche. I don’t have much luck with auto domains because owners never want to spend money. Instead, they always try to offer sales/lead arrangements, which I decline on. There is no good way to prove what leads you push to the shop. It seems to be the scenario in every auto repair shop.

      Your welcome for the info. Hope it helps. Thanks for reading.

      • RK Says:

        Thank you very much! Most of my names a product related.I have some 3 character .net’s,
        org’s and info’s.Quite a few hyphenated .com’s(also product oriented),although I do have some jobs names.To be honest with you, I never tried to sell domains before, I was more into developing them, or keeping them for the future(like 3-char. names, for example).Most of my names are in the process of being developed, but I still have some, that I registered(I’m a believer in hand-registration as well – the only times I bought names were with 3 -char. domains and I never paid more than $100 per name) to try to resell. So in my case: names for sale+no domain selling experience= bunch of questions(hope you don’t mind) 🙂

      • Suisun Blog Says:

        Sure. Your welcome. your three digit .net, .org, and .info domains can find the right buyer. Visit DNJournal.com. Scroll down to the bottom of the page. Click on ‘Domain Sales.’ Read that link every Wednesday. They report on industry sales. Key an eye out for auctions at Sedo and Go Daddy. If you have high traffic domains, Sedo has a brokerage service that charged 15%.

        Sedo is usually the top domain sales leader in the aftermarket. They have excellent brokers. Go Daddy has many hyphenated domains that sell in their auction. In my opinion, I would prefer to submit names in an auction that doesn’t charge a reserve fee. You can verify your traffic at Compete.com.

        Place the domain name in the box, and determine how much unique traffic you generate. Generating 1K+ per month is a good number. Appraisal systems are not going to give you the approximate value. One multi-hyphenated domain sold for $38K several months ago. It was a foreign buyer that purchased on Sedo. If you plan to sale, I think Sedo is the best. You can get the most out of every domain there. Domains are selling for good amounts. If you have good traffic sites from developing them in the past, you will make plenty of sales. The product domain, even with hyphens, will sell.

        For experimental purposes, use 7Zoom.com to view some of your domain’s values based on multiple factors. They’re not the industry standards, but it can tell you the number of backlinks, Google Page Rank, unique traffic, domain age, and a value. Estibot weighs the value on keywords. It helped me to evaluate many domains. At first, I used to register based on value. But, I did make some good decisions to buy job, taxi, and movie domains that opened doors for future sales, in addition to those particular domains. Job domains are extremely popular.

        Let me know if you have any questions. I’ll do my best to answer them. The Sedo link is below. I have additional resources in the domaining resources section. I consider Sedo to be the Apple of the domain industry. Go Daddy is an excellent registrar to buy new domain names. 100% of my domains are registered there. Thanks for reading.

  4. RK Says:

    Thank you for the tips.Just added some names to Sedo.
    Is there any way to ask you some questions in private or you prefer for all conversations to be through the comments(for the future generations of domainers to know)?:)

  5. Jason Says:

    I will send you a test email. Whenever you have any questions, let me know. Thank.

  6. 1powerbroker Says:

    Hello, I have a few a name I want you check and pass if worth your name thank you
    Best Regards, Matthew

    ADACRES.COM
    4/15/2012
    Active

    ARTICLEACRES.COM
    4/15/2012
    Active

    AUDITSTUDIES.COM
    4/15/2012
    Active

    AUTOINSURANCEWEEKLY.COM
    4/15/2012
    Active

    BANNERSCONNECT.COM
    4/14/2012
    Active

    BANNERSCONNECTION.COM
    4/14/2012
    Active

    BARGAINSQUEEZE.COM
    4/19/2012
    Active

    BARGINEERBROKER.COM
    4/19/2012
    Active

    BUYORSELLWITH.US
    3/4/2013
    Active

    CLEARMYVIRUS.COM
    4/13/2012
    Active

    DIGIAPPROVALS.COM
    4/15/2012
    Active

    EARTHQUAKEIMPACTS.INFO
    4/14/2012
    Active

    EARTHQUAKERECORDS.INFO
    4/14/2012
    Active

    EARTHQUAKEREPORTS.INFO
    4/14/2012
    Active

    FOREXBIDASK.COM
    4/14/2012
    Active

    FOREXSIGNALSSHOP.COM
    4/12/2012
    Active

    FOREXTRADEIT.COM
    4/14/2012
    Active

    FOSTERPARENTS.INFO
    4/12/2012
    Active

    FXNEWSCAST.COM
    4/18/2012
    Active

    GOVERNMENTLANDMARKS.INFO
    4/14/2012
    Active

    HISTORYMUSEUMS.INFO
    4/14/2012
    Active

    IDENTITYANALYSIS.COM
    4/15/2012
    Active

    IPHOUDINI.COM
    4/14/2012
    Active

    LOWERQUOTEWITH.US
    4/14/2012
    Active

    NETSURFTOOLS.COM
    4/12/2012
    Active

    NURTIONALSUPPLEMENTS.INFO
    4/13/2012
    Active

    ORGANICPETDESSERT.COM
    4/13/2012
    Active

    PRICEY.ME
    4/14/2012
    Active

    QUOTERATESNOW.COM
    4/15/2012
    Active

    RENTMOVIESWITH.US
    4/14/2012
    Active

    SLUMDOGBILLIONAIRE.COM
    4/14/2012
    Active

    SMARTMONKEYTOOLS.COM
    4/12/2012
    Active

    SOCIALPARTE.COM
    4/14/2012
    Active

    SOCIALSECURITYCUTS.COM
    4/14/2012
    Active

    SPAMANGEL.COM
    4/15/2012
    Active

    SQUEEZEBARGAINS.COM
    4/19/2012
    Active

    STATELANDMARKS.INFO
    4/14/2012
    Active

    SURFWEBTOOLS.COM
    4/13/2012
    Active

    TASTEFUL.ME
    4/20/2012
    Active

    RENTMOVIESWITH.US
    4/14/2012
    Active
    4/12/2012
    Active

    TRASHBADCREDIT.COM
    My Email:Matthew@cyberbroker.info

  7. nic tanney Says:

    I am new, well kinda, to the domain selling business but have been involved in the Internet since early 1995. I purchased over 5000 domain names, sold a few but the highest was $185,500. I now have 475 domains left and I do want to market and sell them and looking for some brokers to help out. I believe a few of the domains have great value, a few listed below:
    creditsolve.com
    bankrobbers.com
    stockprofits.com
    casinobank.com
    minorcheck.com
    motorvoters.com
    crowncard.com

    As mentioned I am new at this, the domains I sold was random and now I would like to make it a business. Appreciate any and all advice..

    Thanks

    Nic

    • Jason Says:

      Hi Nic,

      The best domain platforms to sell your domain names are Sedo and Afternic. You have a few good domains. Bankrobbers.com has good exact match searches. Casinobank.com is a good domain. I think creditsolve.com is a good domain to push to a credit repair or credit management company. I’m sure you own a valuable domain portfolio.

      The top domain blogs to visit are:
      TheDomains.com
      ElliotsBlog.com
      DomainNameWire.com

      You can read the weekly domain name sales list on:
      DNJournal.com

      Do a Whois owner lookup of domains that company own which are similar to yours:
      iWhois.com
      DomainTools.com

      I think you should either park your domains with DomainNameSales.com, InternetTraffic.com or Sedo.com. InternetTraffic.com is run by the top domainer in the world – Frank Schilling. You will have more quality visits to the domain names to possibly produce good sales. Sedo has good brokers that charge 15-20%. Also, consider listing your domain names on Afternic. I heard they produce top domain sales every week.

      Another option is to submit some domains in auctions such as NameJet.com. Contact end-users that have an immediate need. Put the domain keywords in Google with parenthesis. Check all the companies that advertise in the sponsor links. Contact these end-users and use advertising as a selling point. They can update the DNS and point the keyword domain to their website. This will give them another traffic outlet to their website.

      I’m sure your domain names are brandable. Keep track of past DNJournal.com domain sales. Get an idea of the domain name sales, the domain age, keyword value, appraisal value, and other stats.

      Check links on Alexa.com. Input the domain name into the box. It will tell you how many sites are linking in. Use compete.com to check monthly unique traffic. the traffic is not that accurate, but it is a good indicator.

      Appraise the domain at Valuate.com and Estibot.com. The appraisals are not accurate; however, you can evaluate the keyword value. Even domain names with no search value can make a good sale since innovation is also a selling point.

      Hang around the domain blogs, as mentioned above. Visit DNForum.com to chat with domain investors. You can ask domain questions on DomainQuestions.com. Do some research on your domain names. Visit the bottom link of the top domain name sales at Valuate. See what end-users paid for the top domains. Separate your domain names into categories. Present your domains to relevant end-users that operate in the niche.

      The best domain brokers work at Sedo. It’s crazy that you purchased 5000 domain names. Frank Schilling owns 380,000 domain names. Mike Berkens owns 80,000, while Mike Mann owns 280,000. You can also present your domain names to WWMI.com.

      Let me know how it all goes. Good luck.

      • nic tanney Says:

        `Morning Jason,

        You sent me a lot of work and I appreciate it. FYI by applying your methods I have an offer on one of my domains, a really nice offer.
        Anyway it seems I should owe you a commission. I will continue with your advice and I assure you I will be in the top domainers, you will hear about Nic Tanney, guaranteed

        Thanks again for all your advice and if I can help in anyway, just ask..

        Nic

      • Jason Says:

        Good morning Nic,

        Congratulations on your nice offer. I’m glad I could help. I do believe you can become one of the top domainers.

        The top domainers are Frank Schilling (DomainNameSales.com – owns 385,000 domains and scored a huge Lottery.net sale of $245,000) Mike Berkens (WWMI.com and TheDomains.com), Mike Mann (DomainMarket.com) Kevin Ham (God.com owner and many top sites) Richard Lau (DomainName.com and DomainManager.com), Francois Carrillo (former owner of Domaining.com, runs Cax.com) and Rick Schwartz (Domain King with many top sales such as iReport.com at $750k to CNN, Candy.com at $3 million and revenue take and more).

        I have a ton of information I can give you. I used to write articles on a domain website that is now popular. I also ran another good domain blog but stopped writing there because I didn’t make any revenue to maintain the site.

        Ever since I graduated with a graduate degree this year, everything has gone downhill. My main challenge is finding a better job beyond the web consulting position I do now for a company. Financially, I can’t seem to get ahead due to my the high cost of living and student loans.

        I have strong writing skills, domain skills and marketing experience. I can give you valuable information you can use to make additional sales. Any commission will vastly improve my situtation. I write a lot on all my sites to help people, but my traffic hasn’t amounted to any revenue. I’m currently struggling to get out of the quicksand.

        I believe you can make many future domain sales. I will send you links to my past articles to give you a crash course on domaining. Keep up the great work. Thanks. Happy Halloween!

        Sincerely,
        Jason

      • nic tanney Says:

        Hi Jason,

        Sounds like you and I can make money together, I am an OLD (67) entrepreneur, went into the roofing business at age 12, since, all kinds of interesting businesses. Had a few rough years but not complaining, still able to operate. All of my money earned, scored, or? is going into http://legalgaming.com Anyway I do have 475 domains, all really old, most booked in the 90’s. I am not 100% sure of the value but I want to liquidate all of them and launch Legal Gaming. Wanna partner up on selling my domains? I will give you a 20-25% commission.

        Here is my number if you would like to chat..

        Cheers

        Nic 570-875-7148


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