DayBuyDay.com sells for $10,000 – Why?

Why in the world would a company pay $10,000 for DayBuyDay.com? The domain fits their branding plan, but is not worth $10,000 with no real traffic, or high monthly searches. I’ll never understand how owners find buyers for over priced domains.

This sale is a perfect example of what makes me furious. It took me 100 calls to find a lead on a domain that is worth over $100K, which will be priced much less than the appraisal. The domain is specific to the business, and will definitely improve the company and save them money in the future.

But then, I see companies selling domains that have no business scoring high sales. In the future, the domain will be worth the sale price. I don’t understand why companies are paying top dollars for mediocre domains, when they turn down generic domains that compliment their business.

For the past 17 years, I planned to merge into Hollywood as an actor/writer. I’ve experienced major obstacles and challenges that held me back from accomplishing my long-term goal. Hollywood and the domain industry are exactly the same. It is who you know that will produce a big sale. If Sedo, or another company brokers a domain, then you can make a profit. Most end-users are more comfortable with established domain companies than with private parties.

I own several domains that produce better stats than DayBuyDay.com. DeliciousThaiFood.com, ProfessionalHairServices.com, and BelieveInEnergy.com produce better keyword results than DayBuyDay.com. However, the two best things DayBuyDay.com has going is that it’s an aged domain and the company is branding the name. Other than that, I don’t see the appeal.

I recommend domain investors to set “make offer” on all their domains. It’s not fair that many domain investors and companies are selling their domain for 10 times their value, when others struggles to get 10% of the value on better domains.

I don’t plan to sell CoverLetterServices.com. I already make $144 per year on 1 web directory listing. I will cease the negotiation on another cover letter domain. The buyer is refusing to up their offer a third time. I’m no longer interested in selling the domain, especially with recent domain sales setting records. I want a piece of the sales pie. I’m tired of making small sales, and getting rejected on brokering big time domains. It is now time to ask more for my domains.

You will see many over valued domains selling because they are aged domains. In addition, such domains are purchased for branding reasons. There is no other reason to pay $10,000 for a mediocre domains. In my opinion, DayBuyDay.com is not worth 15% of the purchase price. DaybyDay.com is the better domain that is worth $10,000.

I get rejected on selling two word service domains, only to see over priced domains being reported on the DN Journal every week. It’s appalling to sit back and hope for a big sale. Domain companies monopolize the aftermarket, making it hard for domain owners to establish a business outside of their sales platform. I picked up the phone and called 200 times in the past few weeks. I don’t mind the constant rejections, but these companies are usually clueless as to why they won’t purchase a domain.

Whenever a person asks what you want for a domain, give them a price right away. Don’t waste time preparing an e-mail. A city manager asked me what I wanted for my GEO city domains. I told him that I would send an e-mail with appraisal values and information. I made a mistake. A week later, they declined to buy the domains. What I should have done is to set prices right at that moment.

On another potential sale, I provided too much information on two box office domains, and lost the sale. You have to be direct, and share as little information as possible. Maybe I’m not meant to sell the domains. Who knows? All I know is that I don’t have the money to pay my rent. I lost two sales that could have made my situation much better. It pisses me off.

Anyhow, DayBuyDay.com is an unimpressive sale. I’m not moved when owners make over priced sales. Some offers are simple as an e-mail stating that another is going to pay an X amount for the domain.

I have to go back and forth on a cover letter domain that I know is worth at least $1500. And the buyer is refusing to increase their offer. I make $144 after fees for 1 web listing on coverletterservices.com. I wont let the other cover letter domain go for less than my last counter offer. There’s a reason the buyer wants the domain. I deserve to get the amount I’m asking for the domain. I will end the negotiation process soon.

Sometimes, I find the DN Journal is a bragging platform to boost egos. There are many great deals on Bargain Domains, and end-users are clueless about going there to make a purchase. They would rather pay 10 to 20 to 30 times of a domain’s value. It’s ridiculous. These are the very same companies that will make excuses on buying valuable domains, only to purchase over priced domains with little marketing potential. The domain industry is a joke, or maybe it is the companies that are clueless. Who knows? $10,000 would be better spent on a domain that is worthy of the price.

Thanks for reading.

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